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Floattubes, Kickboats, Pontoon Kickboats, Kayaks etc...
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TOPIC: Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak...

Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak... 6 months 1 week ago #485

So, every type of watercraft will get you onto the water, but which do you choose as a starter?

I have owned/fished off of the following and hopefully my experiences will help you a bit with your decision...

If you are reading this and can add/edit to the list, please do.

Floattube:
Pros:

Easy to transport, easy to setup
On the water spot holding very easy due to me using my legs and keeping me in position with flippers
It got me to spots where I would not be able to get if I only fished from the bank
It was a once off buy, no further licencing etc involved

Cons
I'm wet the whole day... if I want to be wet I'll swim...
I felt limited on the number of rods that I could take with.
I felt limited on the amount of lures/tackle that I could take with.
I get tired from kicking.
Because I sat very close to the water I felt that I'm missing areas to fish because I can't see too far around me.
I couldn't fish waters with crocodiles in


Pontoon kickboat
Pros
Easy to transport with a bakkie as it fits nicely into the back. Probably still ok in a small car too.
Easy to setup and pack away, although it takes longer than a floattube
On the water spot holding very easy due to me using my legs and keeping me in position with flippers
I could take as many rods as I want (probably up to 7 or 8)
I could take as much tackle and lures as can be fit into a milk crate
I could fit a trolling motor on the back if my type of kickboat
I could fit electronics and gps onto the frame
It was a once off buy, no further licencing etc involved

Cons
The setup time takes a while if I had to setup everything from scratch every time I got to the water
When the trolling motor and the rods and gear is onto the frame it is difficult to move around
Numb bottom from sitting the whole day
I couldn't fish waters with crocodiles in


Kayak
Pros
Easy to transport with a car, but you need a roof rack or roof bars
I could use it at dams, rivers and on holidays to the coast
On the water spot holding is still easy, BUT I needed to use an anchor to stay on a spot, so there is a little bit more admin involved
I could take as many rods as I wanted (probably up to 7 or 8) that would fit on the rod holders on my milk crate
I could take as much tackle and lures as can be fit into a milk crate
I can fit a trolling motor on the back to enable hands free fishing
I could fit electronics and gps

Cons
I needed a roof rack that was an additional expense. I also did not like driving around with the roof rack permanently on my bakkie as it influenced my fuel economy, so I it took extra time and effort to fit and remove it before and after fishing trips.
Numb bottom from sitting the whole day
Wet bottom from sitting the whole day in a puddle of water.
I couldn't fish waters with crocodiles in.
My arms got tired. If you fish a big body of water you felt it at the end of the day.


Inflatable boat (3m in length)
Pros
Easy to transport in the back of my bakkie, but the pumping time and setup time needs to be taken into account
I could stand and fish! (Being able to do this was a major improvement for me)
I could sit and fish! (You also get tired from standing the whole day...)
Being able to stand I could see further around me
I could fit electronics and gps on the transom
I felt a bit safer in the sense of heavy winds/waves on the water (but see below)
I could take someone with me. This also made the outings more fun.
I could pack a cooler with water/cooldrinks/snacks
I could take many rods, BUT if someone went with space became an issue.
Trolling motor for easy movement across a body of water

Cons
The setup time - getting the thing inflated and deflated before and after a trip
Windy conditions made it difficult to stay in a spot, so an anchor had to be used
A battery had to be bought for the trolling motor - additional expense
A battery charger had to be bought for the battery - additional expense
After the battery was used for a while, it had to be replaced - additional expense
Storing the boat while not in use - it was a bulky bastard...so take your space into account
Punctures/leaks - the type of boat I had was not the best quality, so I was constantly scared of getting a puncture/leak
Running out of battery power on the water. It's not fun paddling one of these back to the launch

Small fiberglass boat (3.6m in length)
Pros
No setup time at the water/day before, hook the trailer and go
I could stand and fish! (Being able to do this was a major improvement for me)
I could sit and fish! (You also get tired from standing the whole day...)
Being able to stand from an elevated deck I could see even further around me
I could fit electronics and gps on the transom
I felt a bit safer in the sense of heavy winds/waves on the water (but see below)
I could take someone with me. This also made the outings more fun.
I could pack a cooler with water/cooldrinks/snacks
I could take many rods
Trolling motor for easy movement across a body of water
Small outboard for easy movement across a body of water

Cons
A trailer had to be towed. On South African pothole filled roads I had to replace a couple of tires.
A trailer had to be towed. This meant extra licencing every year
A space was necessary to store the boat/trailer. In complexes/estates this is a problem as the body corporate don't take kindly to a boat/trailer standing in the driveway...
A battery had to be bought for the trolling motor - additional expense
A battery charger had to be bought for the battery - additional expense
After the battery was used for a while, it had to be replaced - additional expense
Fuel had to be bought for the outboard motor
On the specific boat I had I did not feel safe during stormy/windy/choppy weather.
The boat could only be launched at dams where there is a proper launch/jetty or where it is not too muddy. If you have a 4x4 this will probably not be an issue


So there it is...as you can see I did not add a "big boat" here, as I have only occasionally fished off of one, but never owned one myself.

As time progressed my circumstances changed... My needs changed... I have a kid now that is old enough to go fishing with me... and I'm looking again...

Please feel free to add and share your experiences to this.

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Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak... 6 months 1 week ago #486

B.O.A.T = Burn Off Another Thousand

Its a big hole that you throw money into and it doesn't come back at you. You're happy the day you buy it and the day you sell it. Simple as that.

But, Ive also done the similar list yours and find the boat part much easier as a competitive angler.
The village idiot

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Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak... 6 months 1 week ago #488

Biggest advantage of owning a bigger boat (and I classify that as everything from about 16ft and longer) is the freedom it brings.

If you choose the hull carefully you are able to handle conditions that would normally not be accessible to other smaller types of craft. You sometimes have to cross a more exposed section to get to a quieter bay or area that is still fish-able.

If you get into a disagreement with a fishing partner your are not the one losing out on time on the water :P

I love the fact that I can use the bigger boat for other boating leisure activities with the family.

To me the biggest advantage is that when you get home you can just park the boat, hook up the battery chargers and walk away. No need to unpack everything which is a huge time saver especially after long hot day on the water. Time to feet up with a cold one is much shorter. :woohoo: Also love the fact that all my rods and all my tackle are with me at all times ... until my tackle starts exceeding my boat's storage capability .... which is not far from now ... :S

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Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak... 6 months 1 week ago #489

Some background info:
I worked at DWAF for 12 years as a surveyor doing cadastral, engineering, photogrammetric, precise/deflection monitoring and hydrographic surveys, great job, great perks, GREAT fishing spots, plenty of dams, rivers, BUT lousy salary,
We used a variety of boats, cathedral, V and cat hulls, mercruiser V8 inboards, outboard motors 15-115hp, boats 2.5m to 10m in length, solid GRP, Aluminium, RIB's and inflatables.
Worked in water less than 50cm deep.
Never punctured or damaged any inflatable pontoons, or any damage by fishing hooks,
I am aware of a person in st lucia estuary that pulled a gaff into the pontoon.
Ripped a few aluminium and fibreglass bottoms opens and the best, I hit submerged islands in Heyeshope and Gariepdam, ripped off the crankcase and transom.
Spend weeks, months at a time on boats, mapping and contouring dams, farm dams and rivers.
Sank/swamped a few boats in my lifetime.

My choice, based on my needs, old age and body damage.
I went for a Aquacat 4.1m racing duck, with outboard motor, with a custom built removable casting deck/box with trolling motor and electronics and radio, with x2 boxes for batteries, etc.

Pro:
I mostly fishing alone, very stable, "unsinkable, very light, about 200kg on trailer, I can launch/recover the boat by myself
2 person can fish comfortably on the boat
Has ample space, just need to sort out rod storage brackets on pontoons.
Good speed 46km/h on the water, (Ok I can go to 100km/h with a larger motor and different prop)
I use 3-4 rods at most, ruff tote container with lures, ruff tote container for livewell, spares and cooler box is all I need.
Can take the grandchildren out with the boat and play with the tubes, with deck removed,
If I stop suddenly the boat fill with water and we have a temporary splash pool for the kids (just need to add covers to keep water out.)
I know I can't sink it, and it can handle rough water, can get into spots with rocks, shallows without major damage to hull.
I use it for spoonplugging, bass, kurper and carp fishing.
Get home unload tackle and relax,

Cons:
Need to launch boat in deeper water (unhitch trailer and boat, push it deeper, add rope, haul trailer/boat out with vehicle)
Wet, wet, wet, feet are in water - mentality issue - accept it or not.
Fuel, licensing, trailer license, potholes.
Heavy with deck, batteries etc added.
Need to make a casting deck for the rear, just to get more height off the water.

I still have my floattube that I originally used for flyfishing
I had various kayaks and racing K1's and K2's
Built a 14ft Indian canoe - still the bests for quiet mornings on Boskop and Klerkskraal before the wind howls.
Still regret getting rid of it.
Built x2 jonboats 3.0m and 3.6m, got flack at Vaaldam for the larger boat from SAPS - not registered
pro's and cons basically the same as previous posts.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Swarley81

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Big boat, small boat, inflatable boat, pontoon boat, floattube, kayak... 6 months 3 days ago #491

I have read all your comments, pros and cons above with interest!
I must say I am very happy with my Monster Bass inflatable boat! It is 4.2m long and 2.1 m wide with 700 mm pontoons and a 12mm marine ply floor that folds in half. I use a 65 lb Watersnake motor and normally use only the 3rd speed to get to the fishing spots. I hardly use 4 and 5!
The only con I have, is it goes like a a sailboat in the wind but as we normally anchor at our fishing spots, I take a second anchor if it looks like it is going to be a windy day. Space is not a problem!
I bought it with a 10 hp motor which I subsequently sold as motors are not allowed on the farm dams I fish!
After 10 years the seams started to come apart and I had this fixed by a guy that do PVC welding, so I am a happy camper! He did the nose section and transom for R3000, which I thought was quite reasonable for the job!.
I have found two pumps that I use to volume pump it and use my vehicle's tyre pump to top up the boat to the right pressure.
I don't think I will go to anything else for my fishing requirements!
Bass fishing is my passion!
Making my own plastic lures is my hobby!
Catching bass on the lures I make is fulfilling!
The following user(s) said Thank You: Swarley81, Stephenk, Navrik

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